ECR 2015 Press Releases http://myesr.org/taxonomy/term/26 en Comprehensive personalised approach lays new ground for cardiothoracic imaging http://myesr.org/article/103 <span property="schema:name">Comprehensive personalised approach lays new ground for cardiothoracic imaging</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span title="View user profile." href="/user/1" lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">myESR</span> </span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2015-03-27T10:24:09+00:00">Fri, 03/27/2015 - 11:24</span> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p><strong>Sunday, March 8 (ECR)</strong> – Cardiac and thoracic diseases are often intertwined and can be diagnosed during the same examination. Cardiovascular and chest radiologists are therefore trying to broaden their focus, and they have a lot to teach each other. Speakers from both sides will discuss the challenges ahead in today’s New Horizons session at the ECR.</p> <p>Radiologists must adopt a comprehensive approach because of the relationship between diseases of the heart and chest, according to Prof. Christian Loewe, deputy head of the section of cardiovascular and interventional radiology at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>“There are a lot of situations and diseases where chest problems are caused by cardiac diseases and vice versa. There’s a huge interaction between heart and chest, and that’s why it’s interesting and important to look at this relationship in more detail today,” he said.</p> <p>Some of the most severe causes of chest pain are due to cardiovascular diseases, such as myocardial infarction or acute aortic diseases. However, acute chest pain can also be caused by a number of pulmonary diseases, e.g. pulmonary embolism or pneumonia. Radiologists must learn the different life-threatening disorders that cause chest pain, whether they are respiratory or cardiovascular, and they must look at more than one organ during an examination, because technology enables them to, Loewe explained.</p> <p>Prof. Martine Rémy-Jardin, professor of radiology and head of the department of cardiothoracic imaging at the University Centre of Lille in France, will speak about early detection of cardiothoracic disease in smokers. Lung cancer and coronary patients often have the same profile, as many are smokers, and they should be imaged for both pathologies whether they come in for a lung or coronary examination.</p> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_RemyJardin%20Martine_IMGL8558.JPG?itok=0H4Z7BKq 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_RemyJardin%20Martine_IMGL8558.JPG?itok=0H4Z7BKq 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_RemyJardin%20Martine_IMGL8558.JPG?itok=0H4Z7BKq 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_RemyJardin%20Martine_IMGL8558.JPG?itok=0H4Z7BKq 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_RemyJardin%20Martine_IMGL8558.JPG?itok=0H4Z7BKq 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_RemyJardin%20Martine_IMGL8558.JPG?itok=0H4Z7BKq 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_RemyJardin%20Martine_IMGL8558.JPG?itok=0H4Z7BKq" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_Loewe%20Christian.jpg?itok=0V2-iT4g 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_Loewe%20Christian.jpg?itok=0V2-iT4g 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_Loewe%20Christian.jpg?itok=0V2-iT4g 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_Loewe%20Christian.jpg?itok=0V2-iT4g 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_Loewe%20Christian.jpg?itok=0V2-iT4g 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_Loewe%20Christian.jpg?itok=0V2-iT4g 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/NH17_Loewe%20Christian.jpg?itok=0V2-iT4g" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>Despite the well-documented atherogenic effects of smoking, radiologists tend to remain focused on the depiction of emphysema and airways disease in smokers. However, recent guidelines for COPD patients have underlined the major impact of cardiovascular comorbidities, such as atherosclerotic coronary disease, ischaemic cardiopathy, atheromatous lesions of the aorta and supra-aortic vessels, recommending that they should be actively looked for and appropriately treated if present.<br /><br /> This recommendation could have a major impact on the way chest CT examinations of smokers are performed and reported, Rémy-Jardin pointed out. “The impact on the clinician’s understanding of symptoms is important because a given symptom can have a pulmonary or cardiovascular origin,” she said.<br /><br /> In the pretherapeutic assessment of bronchopulmonary carcinoma, chest radiologists should look for signs of COPD, smoking-related infiltrative lung disease and cardiovascular comorbidities, she recommended. Depending on the location and extent of lung carcinoma, the presence of signs suggesting cardiovascular invasion are also worth reporting. When examining coronary disease with CT, radiologists should also look for bronchopulmonary carcinoma and signs of COPD or smoking-related infiltrating disease in the explored volume, depending on the age of the patient and their degree of smoking.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p>***</p> <p>Christian Loewe, Vienna, Austria<br /> Martine Rémy-Jardin, Lille, France</p> <h4> </h4> <h4>New Horizons Session</h4> <p>Sunday, March 8, 08:30–10:00, Room E2<br /><strong>NH 17 Comprehensive personalised imaging of cardiothoracic diseases</strong></p> <ul><li><strong>Chairman’s introduction: how to prepare for the future?</strong><br /> T. Benedek; Targu Mures/RO</li> <li><strong>Patients with acute and chronic chest pain</strong><br /> C. Loewe; Vienna/AT</li> <li><strong>Patients with acute shortness of breath</strong><br /> J. Bremerich; Basle/CH</li> <li><strong>Patients with chronic shortness of breath</strong><br /> E.J.R. van Beek; Edinburgh/UK</li> <li><strong>Early detection for cardiothoracic disease in smokers</strong><br /> M. Rémy-Jardin; Lille/FR</li> <li><strong>Panel discussion: Comprehensive imaging and education in cardiothoracic diseases</strong></li> </ul><p><strong>Captions</strong>:<br /> (right) Prof. Martine Rémy-Jardin is head of the department of cardiothoracic imaging at the University Centre of Lille in France.<br /> (left) Dr. Christian Loewe is deputy head of the cardiovascular and interventional radiology section at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria.<br /><strong>Copyright</strong>: © ESR – European Society of Radiology</p> </div> </div> <i class="banner-image"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg" alt="EU &amp; International Affairs" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </i> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://myesr.org/article/103" data-a2a-title="Comprehensive personalised approach lays new ground for cardiothoracic imaging"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a> <a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a> <a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a></span> Fri, 27 Mar 2015 10:24:09 +0000 myESR 103 at http://myesr.org A guide to software that facilitates clinical research http://myesr.org/article/95 <span property="schema:name">A guide to software that facilitates clinical research </span> <span rel="schema:author"><span title="View user profile." href="/user/1" lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">myESR</span> </span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2015-03-08T10:20:24+00:00">Sun, 03/08/2015 - 11:20</span> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p><strong>Sunday, March 8 (ECR)</strong> – There may not be a designated PACS for research yet, but there are plenty of tools that can simplify research work, as experts will show during a Special Focus session today at the ECR.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>PACS is used in daily clinical practice to view straightforward and routine radiology examinations, but when performing research, one needs totally different settings, according to Prof. Davide Caramella, professor of radiology at Santa Chiara Hospital in Pisa, Italy, who will chair the session.</p> <p>“There are tools developed for clinical practice but they are not applicable to research because the criteria are totally different. For instance, in clinical practice you need to have a very clear identification of the patient by name, surname, birthdate, etc. In research, the study must be as anonymous as possible,” he said.</p> <p>With PACS, radiologists can compare examinations of the same patient to avoid making mistakes. But it’s almost impossible to compare the examination of patient A with patient B, which is exactly what researchers need to do when they evaluate, for instance, the effect of a drug in different patients.</p> <p>In addition, PACS does not support the integration of other software. Add-ons offered by manufacturers to bridge the gap are not good enough for research work, he believes. Instead, researchers can export their data to other software such as OsiriX.</p> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Caramella%20Davide.jpg?itok=_uD6y6xS 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Caramella%20Davide.jpg?itok=_uD6y6xS 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Caramella%20Davide.jpg?itok=_uD6y6xS 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Caramella%20Davide.jpg?itok=_uD6y6xS 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Caramella%20Davide.jpg?itok=_uD6y6xS 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Caramella%20Davide.jpg?itok=_uD6y6xS 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Caramella%20Davide.jpg?itok=_uD6y6xS" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Scarsbrook%20Andrew.jpg?itok=-NjXor7b 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Scarsbrook%20Andrew.jpg?itok=-NjXor7b 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Scarsbrook%20Andrew.jpg?itok=-NjXor7b 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Scarsbrook%20Andrew.jpg?itok=-NjXor7b 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Scarsbrook%20Andrew.jpg?itok=-NjXor7b 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Scarsbrook%20Andrew.jpg?itok=-NjXor7b 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/SF17c_Scarsbrook%20Andrew.jpg?itok=-NjXor7b" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>Extracting image metadata to perform a follow-up study of a patient who has undergone some chemotherapy to establish the response criteria may prove tricky with PACS. Conversely, commercial software, such as RECIST Tracker (Fujifilm) and mintLesion (Mint Medical) enable easy extraction of these metadata, according to Caramella.</p> <p>A whole range of free web resources can help improve research efficiency. Andrew Scarsbrook, clinical associate professor of radiology at Leeds University, UK, will explain to delegates how to harness free applications and open-source software to enhance the performance of imaging research.</p> <p>“It’s possible to create a comprehensive suite of IT tools for imaging research which complement PACS,” he said.</p> <p>Researchers can improve effectiveness by making use of highly specific search engines; they can either create their own bespoke search engine or utilise radiology-centric search engines over and above Google, which are available on the net, he said. To stay up-to-date with radiological developments and literature in an area of interest, and keep up with others’ work, they can also configure customised citation alerts. Pieces of software like Evernote can help them increase efficiency and organisation.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p>Extracting image metadata to perform a follow-up study of a patient who has undergone some chemotherapy to establish the response criteria may prove tricky with PACS. Conversely, commercial software, such as RECIST Tracker (Fujifilm) and mintLesion (Mint Medical) enable easy extraction of these metadata, according to Caramella.</p> <p>A whole range of free web resources can help improve research efficiency. Andrew Scarsbrook, clinical associate professor of radiology at Leeds University, UK, will explain to delegates how to harness free applications and open-source software to enhance the performance of imaging research.</p> <p>“It’s possible to create a comprehensive suite of IT tools for imaging research which complement PACS,” he said.</p> <p>Researchers can improve effectiveness by making use of highly specific search engines; they can either create their own bespoke search engine or utilise radiology-centric search engines over and above Google, which are available on the net, he said. To stay up-to-date with radiological developments and literature in an area of interest, and keep up with others’ work, they can also configure customised citation alerts. Pieces of software like Evernote can help them increase efficiency and organisation.</p> </div> </div> <i class="banner-image"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg" alt="EU &amp; International Affairs" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </i> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://myesr.org/article/95" data-a2a-title="A guide to software that facilitates clinical research "><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a> <a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a> <a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a></span> Sun, 08 Mar 2015 10:20:24 +0000 myESR 95 at http://myesr.org Developments in optical molecular imaging give hope in cancer treatment http://myesr.org/article/116 <span property="schema:name">Developments in optical molecular imaging give hope in cancer treatment</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span title="View user profile." href="/user/1" lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">myESR</span> </span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2015-03-07T10:29:07+00:00">Sat, 03/07/2015 - 11:29</span> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p><strong>Saturday, March 7 (ECR)</strong> – New methods that make it possible to visualise activity on a molecular level will boost optical imaging use in radiology, especially oncology applications. Experts will unveil the secrets of Cerenkov (blue light) radiation, reporter gene imaging and opto-acoustics techniques today during a New Horizons session at the ECR.</p> <p>Speakers will look at molecular activity at the level of gene expression, tumour progression and metastasis, using reporter genes as well as a completely new imaging approach using the blue light of Cerenkov radiation as a tool to optically image radiotracers.</p> <p>Cerenkov radiation is based on Cerenkov light, which is induced by particle-emitting isotopes. The detection of Cerenkov light by highly sensitive optical cameras is known as Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging. Cerenkov radiation offers a unique opportunity to make use of clinically approved radiotracers for optical imaging, according to physician-scientist Prof. Jan Grimm, who works at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York developing innovative imaging approaches, including Cerenkov radiation, for diagnosing cancer.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>“In PET imaging, we can use PET tracers for pre-surgical imaging and during surgery to localise tumour deposits, and then repeat the PET scan after surgery, if needed, all with one and the same agent,” he explained. “However, there is a big push for dual modality (fluorescent and radioactive) agents these days, which combine a fluorochrome [a fluorescent chemical compound that can re-emit light upon light excitation] and a tracer in one molecule. We believe this is unnecessary; the tracer with Cerenkov emission is enough.”</p> <p>Very few fluorochromes are clinically approved, and novel targeted agents would require regulatory approval that would take considerable time and have no guarantee of success. On the other hand, many targeted tracers are already available and can be used for optical Cerenkov imaging, he said.</p> <p>Cerenkov radiation also provides unique features that allow for quantitative optical imaging, which is not always possible with other methods.</p> <p>Prof. Clemens Löwik from Leiden University Medical Centre, the Netherlands, will present an overview of reporter gene imaging, where the promoter (or on/off) switch of a gene is fused to a reporter gene that can be imaged.</p> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Grimm_Lowik_NH15-pet-mri.jpg?itok=jfDeWAUV 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Grimm_Lowik_NH15-pet-mri.jpg?itok=jfDeWAUV 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Grimm_Lowik_NH15-pet-mri.jpg?itok=jfDeWAUV 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Grimm_Lowik_NH15-pet-mri.jpg?itok=jfDeWAUV 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Grimm_Lowik_NH15-pet-mri.jpg?itok=jfDeWAUV 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Grimm_Lowik_NH15-pet-mri.jpg?itok=jfDeWAUV 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Grimm_Lowik_NH15-pet-mri.jpg?itok=jfDeWAUV" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p>Reporter gene imaging in cells and preclinical animal models offers the opportunity to study all kinds of cellular and molecular processes, including the regulation of gene expression, drug effects, and tracking of transplanted cells carrying optical gene reporters, Löwik explained.</p> <p>He will show how reporter gene imaging can follow tumour progression, T-cell migration towards the tumour, activation of T-cells after vaccination with a tumour antigen, and eradication of the tumour by T-cells using multi-colour luciferases.</p> <p>Last but not least, Prof. Dr. Vasilis Ntziachristos, from the Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging at the Helmholtz Centre in Munich, will describe current progress with methods and applications for in-vivo optical and opto-acoustic imaging in cancer.<br /> ***</p> <p>Jan Grimm, New York, United States; Clemens Löwik, Leiden, the Netherlands</p> <p> </p> <h4>New Horizons Session</h4> <p>Saturday, March 7, 14:00–15:30, Room E2<br /><strong>NH 15 Optical molecular imaging: a new dimension for radiology</strong></p> <ul><li><strong>Chairman’s introduction</strong><br /> C.-C. Gluer; Kiel/DE</li> <li><strong>Reporter gene imaging</strong><br /> C.W.G.M. Lowik; Leiden/NL</li> <li><strong>Cerenkov – faster than the speed of light</strong><br /> J. Grimm; New York, NY/US</li> <li><strong>The kiss of light and sound – optoacoustics</strong><br /> V. Ntziachristos; Munich/DE</li> <li><strong>Panel discussion: Potential of optical imaging for translation to human applications</strong></li> </ul><p><strong>Caption</strong>: The continued evolution of PET promises to transform oncology imaging.<br /><strong>Copyright</strong>: © University of Geneva, Switzerland</p> </div> </div> <i class="banner-image"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg" alt="EU &amp; International Affairs" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </i> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://myesr.org/article/116" data-a2a-title="Developments in optical molecular imaging give hope in cancer treatment"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a> <a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a> <a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a></span> Sat, 07 Mar 2015 10:29:07 +0000 myESR 116 at http://myesr.org Cardiac CT gains momentum with cutting-edge techniques http://myesr.org/article/109 <span property="schema:name">Cardiac CT gains momentum with cutting-edge techniques</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span title="View user profile." href="/user/1" lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">myESR</span> </span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2015-03-07T10:27:05+00:00">Sat, 03/07/2015 - 11:27</span> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p><strong>Saturday, March 7 (ECR)</strong> – Cardiac CT is emerging as an alternative to conventional invasive coronary angiography, but its exact potential is yet to be established. Speakers will present the most promising technologies today in a Special Focus session at the ECR.</p> <p>Fractional flow reserve computed tomography (FFR CT) enables coronary stenosis significance to be assessed in a new way, according to Dr. Gorka Bastarrika, a cardiothoracic radiologist at Clinica Universidad de Navarra in Pamplona, Spain.</p> <p>“The main advantage of FFR-CT is that it provides functional information of coronary stenosis severity, which is particularly important in intermediate lesions. The addition of FFR-CT may increase the specificity and positive predictive value of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) and help reclassify false positive patients as true negatives,” he said.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>Moreover, the technique means functional information can be obtained without added radiation, as opposed to myocardial CT perfusion, for example. It could also help in planning and estimating the effect of coronary intervention before the procedure.</p> <p>Three large multicentre clinical trials have validated the only commercially available technology (Heartflow) against conventional FFR. In July 2011, European regulators approved the product for clinical use, but only a few hospitals in Europe are currently using it. The product received U.S. FDA clearance in November 2014.</p> <p>CT stress myocardial perfusion (CTP) is another promising method. Combined with CCTA, it can improve the evaluation of coronary artery stenosis in high-risk patients. The combined use of CCTA and stress CTP has also been shown to lower the number of false positives, which may reduce the number of unnecessary invasive procedures, therefore also reducing costs.</p> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Kitagawa_NH15_Images_ECR2015_0.jpg?itok=yQB1cSab 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Kitagawa_NH15_Images_ECR2015_0.jpg?itok=yQB1cSab 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Kitagawa_NH15_Images_ECR2015_0.jpg?itok=yQB1cSab 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Kitagawa_NH15_Images_ECR2015_0.jpg?itok=yQB1cSab 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Kitagawa_NH15_Images_ECR2015_0.jpg?itok=yQB1cSab 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Kitagawa_NH15_Images_ECR2015_0.jpg?itok=yQB1cSab 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Kitagawa_NH15_Images_ECR2015_0.jpg?itok=yQB1cSab" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p>Stress CTP can either be static – whereby images are acquired during a predefined single time point – or dynamic – whereby images are acquired over a predetermined period of time to characterise the wash-in and wash-out of contrast medium in the myocardium. Dynamic stress CTP is becoming the preferred choice for clinical routine due to the rapid progress in hardware and software for dose reduction, according to Dr. Kakuya Kitagawa, an assistant professor in the department of radiology at Mie University Hospital in Tsu City, Japan.</p> <p>He will describe state-of-the-art techniques for image acquisition and discuss the advantages and limitations of dynamic stress CTP and myocardial delayed enhancement (CTDE).</p> <p>Dr. John Hoe of Mount Elizabeth Medical Center in Singapore will then close the session by discussing plaque imaging with CCTA. In the panel discussion, the speakers will look to the future and try to determine which of these techniques will change clinical practice.<br /> ***</p> <p>Gorka Bastarrika, Pamplona, Spain; Kakuya Kitagawa, Tsu City, Japan</p> <p> </p> <h4>Special Focus Session</h4> <p>Saturday, March 7, 14:00–15:30, Room F1<br /><strong>SF 15 Cardiac CT: cutting-edge techniques</strong></p> <ul><li><strong>Chairman’s introduction: overview of the cutting-edge techniques</strong><br /> R. Salgado; Antwerp/BE</li> <li><strong>Estimation of coronary flow reserve by CT: a new arrival</strong><br /> G. Bastarrika; Pamplona/ES</li> <li><strong>Myocardial perfusion imaging in clinical routine: ready for prime time?</strong><br /> K. Kitagawa; Mie/JP</li> <li><strong>Plaque imaging with cardiac CT: coming of age?</strong><br /> J. Hoe; Singapore/SG</li> <li><strong>Panel discussion: Which technique will change clinical practice?</strong></li> </ul><p><strong>Caption</strong>:<br /> 61-year-old female with atypical chest pain. Focal calcification in proximal left anterior descending (LAD) artery precluded assessment of degree of stenosis. Dynamic CT stress myocardial perfusion imaging showed reduced stress perfusion in the anteroseptal wall and apical wall, suggesting LAD stenosis. Invasive coronary angiography demonstrated high-grade stenosis with reduced FFR in the proximal LAD.<br /><strong>Copyright</strong>: © Dr. Kakuya Kitagawa, Mie University Hospital, Tsu City, Japan</p> </div> </div> <i class="banner-image"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg" alt="EU &amp; International Affairs" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </i> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://myesr.org/article/109" data-a2a-title="Cardiac CT gains momentum with cutting-edge techniques"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a> <a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a> <a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a></span> Sat, 07 Mar 2015 10:27:05 +0000 myESR 109 at http://myesr.org ESR takes action to encourage replacement of ageing equipment http://myesr.org/article/141 <span property="schema:name">ESR takes action to encourage replacement of ageing equipment</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span title="View user profile." href="/user/1" lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">myESR</span> </span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2015-03-06T12:02:37+00:00">Fri, 03/06/2015 - 13:02</span> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p><strong>Friday, March 6 (ECR)</strong> – The state of imaging equipment in Europe is alarming and a panel of experts will confront the issue today during a Professional Challenges session on problems impeding the harmonisation of imaging standards in Europe.</p> <p>The older the equipment, the lower the quality of imaging. According to the European Coordination Committee of the Radiological Electromedical and Healthcare IT Industry (COCIR), equipment is rapidly ageing in Europe. In the EU, 60% of CT machines were up to five years old in 2008; in 2013, the number dropped to 49.5%.</p> <p>To tackle the issue, the ESR published a position paper on machine renewal, stating that equipment less than five years old is state-of-the-art technology. Equipment between six and ten years old that is properly maintained is suitable for practice, but radiology departments should develop a strategy to replace them. Machines over ten years old must be replaced.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>Today’s speakers will elaborate on the ESR’s analysis of the public procurement process across Europe, which is highly variable in complexity from country to country.</p> <p>“The ESR’s paper might be in many instances a crucial reference in talks with hospital authorities and the government when dealing with the important topic of equipment renewal, which represents a huge problem in many countries and departments,” said Prof. Boris Brkljačić, chair of the Department of Radiology, University Hospital Dubrava, Zagreb, and head of the ESR’s Communication and External Affairs Committee.</p> <p>Distribution of equipment is also problematic in Europe. For instance in Croatia, small institutions are sometimes better equipped than large centres who treat trauma patients and require the most modern CT scanners. The problem stems from local issues surrounding renewal. Public procurement through the tender process is long-winded, sometimes taking up to one year. Moreover, because of the lack of clarity in the process, tenders often fail when unsuccessful bidders file complaints about minor legal points, Brkljačić explained.</p> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Brkljacic_PC12a_B%20Birkljacic%20old%20equipment.jpg?itok=yh_Olj6w 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Brkljacic_PC12a_B%20Birkljacic%20old%20equipment.jpg?itok=yh_Olj6w 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Brkljacic_PC12a_B%20Birkljacic%20old%20equipment.jpg?itok=yh_Olj6w 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Brkljacic_PC12a_B%20Birkljacic%20old%20equipment.jpg?itok=yh_Olj6w 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Brkljacic_PC12a_B%20Birkljacic%20old%20equipment.jpg?itok=yh_Olj6w 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Brkljacic_PC12a_B%20Birkljacic%20old%20equipment.jpg?itok=yh_Olj6w 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Brkljacic_PC12a_B%20Birkljacic%20old%20equipment.jpg?itok=yh_Olj6w" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p>The financial crisis has hit some European countries harder than others. But health budgets were already being allocated very differently across the EU before it occurred, according to data collected by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in 2012.</p> <p>Among the least equipped countries were Hungary (2.8 MR units and 7.7 CT scanners per million population) Romania, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, and perhaps more surprisingly, France and the United Kingdom. On the contrary, Greece, Cyprus and Italy were among the countries with the highest numbers of machines; Italy being the highest with 24.6 MRI units, and Greece having the most CT equipment with 34.8 CT scanners per million population.</p> <p>Speakers will stress the need to modernise imaging equipment across Europe, and highlight the importance of developing key quality and safety indicators and supporting them through investing in education and training.<br /> ***</p> <p>Boris Brkljačić, Zagreb, Croatia</p> <p> </p> <h4>Professional Challenges Session</h4> <p>Friday, March 6, 16:00–17:30, Room F2<br /><strong>PC 12a Harmonised approach for imaging in Europe: myth or reality?</strong></p> <ul><li><strong>Chairman’s introduction</strong><br /> L. Donoso; Barcelona/ES</li> <li><strong>Current heterogeneities in imaging in Europe</strong><br /> G. Frija; Paris/FR</li> <li><strong>Imaging equipment: an ESR perspective</strong><br /> B. Brkljačić; Zagreb/HR</li> <li><strong>Equipment age – COCIR</strong><br /> N. Denjoy; Brussels/BE</li> <li><strong>Training and certification</strong><br /> B. Ertl-Wagner; Munich/DE</li> <li><strong>Issues related to coding terminology and IT access</strong><br /> P. Mildenberger; Mainz/DE</li> <li><strong>Panel discussion: A global plan for imaging</strong><br /> J. Griebel; Neuherberg/DE (HERCA Chair of the Working Group on Medical Applications – BfS, Germany)<br /> T. Peetso; Brussels/BE (Policy Officer of Unit ‘Health and Wellbeing’ – DG CNECT, European Commission)<br /> A. Rys; Brussels/BE (Director Health systems and products – DG SANCO, European Commission)<br /> G. Simeonov; Luxembourg/LU (Policy Officer Radiation Protection Unit – DG ENER, European Commission)</li> </ul><p><strong>Caption</strong>:<br /> This 16-slice multislice CT scanner was installed at the University Hospital Dubrava in Zagreb a decade ago. It is still functioning, but should be replaced.<br /><strong>Copyright</strong>: © Prof. Boris Brkljačić, University Hospital Dubrava, Zagreb</p> </div> </div> <i class="banner-image"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg" alt="EU &amp; International Affairs" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </i> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://myesr.org/article/141" data-a2a-title="ESR takes action to encourage replacement of ageing equipment"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a> <a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a> <a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a></span> Fri, 06 Mar 2015 12:02:37 +0000 myESR 141 at http://myesr.org CAD is helpful in detection of small polyps but needs experienced hands http://myesr.org/article/126 <span property="schema:name">CAD is helpful in detection of small polyps but needs experienced hands</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span title="View user profile." href="/user/1" lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">myESR</span> </span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2015-03-06T10:30:56+00:00">Fri, 03/06/2015 - 11:30</span> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p><strong>Friday, March 6 (ECR)</strong> – Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) can only enhance performance if used correctly, and does not reduce the need for training, experts agree. Furthermore, CAD is moving away from pure detection to clinical decision support, but the adoption of new reading paradigms for the screening scenario and improvements in how the technology presents results are both vital if it is to become an essential imaging tool, experts will explain during a Refresher Course today.</p> <p>CAD for colonography shows particular potential. Most radiologists will come across it in their workflow, so they need to understand sensitivity and specificity issues, as well as when CAD should be used in this area. The major benefits of the technique are in 6–9mm polyps, which are often difficult for the radiologist to spot, according to Dr. Stuart Taylor, professor of medical imaging and consultant gastrointestinal radiologist at University College London, who will speak during the course.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>“CAD acts like a spell check for small polyps. There are also instances when tumours and large polyps are missed by the radiologist before CAD draws attention to them,” he said.</p> <p>However, CAD is not 100% accurate and doesn’t reduce the need for training in CT colonography interpretation, according to Taylor. False negatives can present a challenge too. Typically the computer programme looks for the rounded bowler-hat contours of a polyp, but it may miss the flatter polyps and large mass-like lesions that don’t have characteristic rounded contours.</p> <p>Most manufacturers are further developing CAD using validated CT colonography cases, improving the technology’s diagnostic capacity. CAD advances may also benefit patients regarding full bowel preparation prior to the procedure, meaning that patients will no longer have to take unpleasant bowel preparations before CT colonography, Taylor said.</p> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Taylor%20CAD%20colon%20figure%201.jpg?itok=528nOatl 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Taylor%20CAD%20colon%20figure%201.jpg?itok=528nOatl 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Taylor%20CAD%20colon%20figure%201.jpg?itok=528nOatl 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Taylor%20CAD%20colon%20figure%201.jpg?itok=528nOatl 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Taylor%20CAD%20colon%20figure%201.jpg?itok=528nOatl 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Taylor%20CAD%20colon%20figure%201.jpg?itok=528nOatl 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Taylor%20CAD%20colon%20figure%201.jpg?itok=528nOatl" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Bick-Mammography.jpg?itok=HUHgdX3l 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Bick-Mammography.jpg?itok=HUHgdX3l 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Bick-Mammography.jpg?itok=HUHgdX3l 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Bick-Mammography.jpg?itok=HUHgdX3l 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Bick-Mammography.jpg?itok=HUHgdX3l 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Bick-Mammography.jpg?itok=HUHgdX3l 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC1205_Bick-Mammography.jpg?itok=HUHgdX3l" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>An Italian multicentre screening study has pointed to greater time efficiency of using double-reading first-reader CAD (DR FR CAD). CAD initially reads the image, and this first interpretation is around 90% sensitive. Then the radiologist looks at the image with a primary 2D read. First results show that this double-reading paradigm leads to fast and accurate reporting.</p> <p>“If CT colonography is implemented as a population screening test, there will be very large numbers of datasets to read by a relatively small number of trained radiologists. Implementing CAD in a DR FR CAD paradigm may allow the reading of large case numbers in a limited time,” he said.</p> <p>Mass screening programmes of the 1980s are now moving towards an individualised screening approach. First, CAD tools need to factor in potential risks and point the radiologist to the best imaging studies, according to Prof. Dr. Ulrich Bick, professor of radiology and vice chair of the radiology department at the Charité University Hospital in Berlin. “Traditional CAD doesn’t take into account risk factors such as age or genetics. This, combined with its 98% sensitivity for finding microcalcifications, means that the radiologist must decide whether or not the often numerous findings are clinically relevant,” said Bick, who will provide an update on breast CAD during the course.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p>An Italian multicentre screening study has pointed to greater time efficiency of using double-reading first-reader CAD (DR FR CAD). CAD initially reads the image, and this first interpretation is around 90% sensitive. Then the radiologist looks at the image with a primary 2D read. First results show that this double-reading paradigm leads to fast and accurate reporting.</p> <p>“If CT colonography is implemented as a population screening test, there will be very large numbers of datasets to read by a relatively small number of trained radiologists. Implementing CAD in a DR FR CAD paradigm may allow the reading of large case numbers in a limited time,” he said.</p> <p>Mass screening programmes of the 1980s are now moving towards an individualised screening approach. First, CAD tools need to factor in potential risks and point the radiologist to the best imaging studies, according to Prof. Dr. Ulrich Bick, professor of radiology and vice chair of the radiology department at the Charité University Hospital in Berlin. “Traditional CAD doesn’t take into account risk factors such as age or genetics. This, combined with its 98% sensitivity for finding microcalcifications, means that the radiologist must decide whether or not the often numerous findings are clinically relevant,” said Bick, who will provide an update on breast CAD during the course.</p> </div> </div> <i class="banner-image"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg" alt="EU &amp; International Affairs" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </i> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://myesr.org/article/126" data-a2a-title="CAD is helpful in detection of small polyps but needs experienced hands"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a> <a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a> <a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a></span> Fri, 06 Mar 2015 10:30:56 +0000 myESR 126 at http://myesr.org Technical and clinical challenges slow down integration of imaging biomarkers in Europe http://myesr.org/article/134 <span property="schema:name">Technical and clinical challenges slow down integration of imaging biomarkers in Europe</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span title="View user profile." href="/user/1" lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">myESR</span> </span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2015-03-05T10:33:42+00:00">Thu, 03/05/2015 - 11:33</span> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p><strong>Thursday, March 5 (ECR)</strong> – Integration of imaging biomarkers in Europe is a challenge, and a number of issues must be overcome so that the full potential of quantitative imaging can be realised, renowned researchers will show in a session today at the ECR.</p> <p>Quantitative imaging enables disease to be found very early and considerably improves treatment monitoring. In healthy tissue for instance, researchers can use quantitative imaging to study the functional properties of this tissue in order to get the most important meaning for biologists, physicists, etc., in a non-invasive way. Based on this information, they can develop biomarkers, which help to study the disease and its history, use the data to predict outcome and, most importantly, to determine the responsiveness of individual person to therapy – and assess its efficiency.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>Applications for imaging biomarkers include the detection and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, neurological diseases, musculoskeletal disorders, metabolic diseases, autoimmune pathologies and inflammation. Biomarkers also play a key role in the development of new drugs.</p> <p>Several bottlenecks currently prevent quantitative imaging from fully benefiting healthcare. Imaging biomarkers have to be technically validated, robust and reproducible; then they must be clinically validated. This process is extremely long. To make matters worse, imaging biomarkers are not included in the landscape of European biobanks.</p> <p>“There is a great and urgent need to include biomarkers in European biobanks, since imaging repositories are dealing with big data, and have specific technical requirements in terms of codification, standards and interoperability,” said Prof. Guy Frija, consultant radiologist at the Imaging Department at Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou in Paris, who will chair the session.</p> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20tumor.jpg?itok=NYP93Zqh 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20tumor.jpg?itok=NYP93Zqh 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20tumor.jpg?itok=NYP93Zqh 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20tumor.jpg?itok=NYP93Zqh 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20tumor.jpg?itok=NYP93Zqh 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20tumor.jpg?itok=NYP93Zqh 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20tumor.jpg?itok=NYP93Zqh" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20tumor.jpg?itok=ULanp9VC 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20tumor.jpg?itok=ULanp9VC 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20tumor.jpg?itok=ULanp9VC 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20tumor.jpg?itok=ULanp9VC 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20tumor.jpg?itok=ULanp9VC 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20tumor.jpg?itok=ULanp9VC 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20tumor.jpg?itok=ULanp9VC" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p> </p> <p>Frija, who is Past-President of the European Society of Radiology, pushed for the society’s establishment of a European Biomarkers Task Force, creating synergies with RSNA’s Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance and tackling clinical validation of biomarkers at a European level.</p> <p>Quantitative imaging must also overcome a number of technical difficulties. MR offers a variety of techniques – diffusion imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced MR and spectroscopy – to measure tissue and obtain biochemical information on the tissue of interest. But MR examinations are not reproducible and this is a major obstacle for quantification, according to Prof. Siegfried Trattnig, Professor and Head of the Centre of Excellence for High Field MR, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy at Vienna General Hospital, who will also speak during the session.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>In addition, performing quantitative imaging takes time compared with regular scans. Patients must lie still for longer in the scanner for multiparametric data to be obtained, so they are more likely to move and this can hamper data quality. “What we really need is a fast technique and the best would be if we could acquire multiple parameters simultaneously,” he said.</p> <p>This may change with recently developed sequences, in which researchers can acquire T1 and T2 relaxation times of a certain tissue or region with the same sequence. But the biggest advance may yet come from MR Fingerprinting (MRF), which completely changes data acquisition, post-processing and visualisation. Trattnig will present these advances in detail during his talk.<br /> ***</p> <p>Guy Frija, Paris, France; Siegfried Trattnig, Vienna, Austria</p> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20volunteer.jpg?itok=8rxlrIFj 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20volunteer.jpg?itok=8rxlrIFj 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20volunteer.jpg?itok=8rxlrIFj 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20volunteer.jpg?itok=8rxlrIFj 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20volunteer.jpg?itok=8rxlrIFj 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20volunteer.jpg?itok=8rxlrIFj 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T1%20volunteer.jpg?itok=8rxlrIFj" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20volunteer.jpg?itok=98EcAiWv 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20volunteer.jpg?itok=98EcAiWv 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20volunteer.jpg?itok=98EcAiWv 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20volunteer.jpg?itok=98EcAiWv 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20volunteer.jpg?itok=98EcAiWv 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20volunteer.jpg?itok=98EcAiWv 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/Trattnig_PC8a_MRF%20T2%20volunteer.jpg?itok=98EcAiWv" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <h4>Professional Challenges Session</h4> <p>Thursday, March 5, 16:00–17:30, Room F1<br /><strong>PC 8a Integration of imaging biomarker activities on a European level</strong></p> <ul><li><strong>Chairman’s introduction</strong><br /> G. Frija; Paris/FR</li> <li><strong>From qualitative to quantitative imaging: a paradigm shift in radiology</strong><br /> S. Trattnig; Vienna/AT</li> <li><strong>Experience of the Quantitative Imaging Alliance (QIBA) of the RSNA</strong><br /> R. Boellaard; Amsterdam/NL</li> <li><strong>Introduction to the Quantitative Imaging European Task Force</strong><br /> H.-U. Kauczor; Heidelberg/DE</li> <li><strong>Clinical validation of imaging biomarkers and their role in European Medicine Agency (EMA) applications</strong><br /> O. Clément; Paris/FR</li> <li><strong>The role of imaging biomarkers in the EORTC clinical trials</strong><br /> N.M. deSouza; Sutton/UK</li> <li><strong>Panel discussion: How to strengthen the role of imaging biomarkers in clinical trials</strong></li> </ul> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <h4>Professional Challenges Session</h4> <p>Thursday, March 5, 16:00–17:30, Room F1<br /><strong>PC 8a Integration of imaging biomarker activities on a European level</strong></p> <ul><li><strong>Chairman’s introduction</strong><br /> G. Frija; Paris/FR</li> <li><strong>From qualitative to quantitative imaging: a paradigm shift in radiology</strong><br /> S. Trattnig; Vienna/AT</li> <li><strong>Experience of the Quantitative Imaging Alliance (QIBA) of the RSNA</strong><br /> R. Boellaard; Amsterdam/NL</li> <li><strong>Introduction to the Quantitative Imaging European Task Force</strong><br /> H.-U. Kauczor; Heidelberg/DE</li> <li><strong>Clinical validation of imaging biomarkers and their role in European Medicine Agency (EMA) applications</strong><br /> O. Clément; Paris/FR</li> <li><strong>The role of imaging biomarkers in the EORTC clinical trials</strong><br /> N.M. deSouza; Sutton/UK</li> <li><strong>Panel discussion: How to strengthen the role of imaging biomarkers in clinical trials</strong></li> </ul> </div> </div> <i class="banner-image"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg" alt="EU &amp; International Affairs" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </i> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://myesr.org/article/134" data-a2a-title="Technical and clinical challenges slow down integration of imaging biomarkers in Europe"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a> <a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a> <a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a></span> Thu, 05 Mar 2015 10:33:42 +0000 myESR 134 at http://myesr.org Insights into the future of radiology http://myesr.org/article/87 <span property="schema:name">Insights into the future of radiology</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span title="View user profile." href="/user/1" lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">myESR</span> </span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2015-03-05T10:17:20+00:00">Thu, 03/05/2015 - 11:17</span> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p><strong>Thursday, March 5 (ECR)</strong> – Radiology as we know it is bound to change profoundly. The attitude of radiologists towards this transformation and how they can cope with tightening budgets will be fundamental, experts will argue during today’s Professional Challenges session at the ECR.</p> <p>The emergence of quantitative imaging, and the validation of an increasing number of imaging biomarkers for prognosis, diagnosis or therapy monitoring, have already started changing clinical practice. Clinical radiologists must learn how to use these new tools, but many are reticent, as it requires extra work, according to Prof. Gabriel Krestin, professor and chairman of the department of radiology at Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>“Extracting quantitative data from a cardiac examination takes up to 30 minutes, so you need dedicated personnel to do that; preferably radiographers. The workflow of radiologists could be seriously disrupted if they had to perform such extensive post-processing of images, and the consequence would be a decrease in efficiency, particularly because nobody pays for the additional measurements,” he said.</p> <p>Plenty of imaging biomarkers are currently in development, such as biomarkers for vascular disease to evaluate the degree of stenosis, and for volumes of white matter brain lesions in cerebrovascular disease, so it is urgent that radiologists become aware of the added value of biomarkers and have proper training, Krestin said.</p> <p>Many among the medical community think that all existing biomarkers – from imaging, but also genetics, physiology, biochemistry, etc. – should be integrated into a single diagnostic report, to answer a clinical question based on different types of biomarkers. This would avoid a long process and increase efficiency and effectiveness. Supporting IT solutions would have to be developed to answer the clinical request between all specialists.</p> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_KRESTIN%20Gabriel__ECR2015.jpg?itok=hd3WRsbk 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_KRESTIN%20Gabriel__ECR2015.jpg?itok=hd3WRsbk 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_KRESTIN%20Gabriel__ECR2015.jpg?itok=hd3WRsbk 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_KRESTIN%20Gabriel__ECR2015.jpg?itok=hd3WRsbk 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_KRESTIN%20Gabriel__ECR2015.jpg?itok=hd3WRsbk 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_KRESTIN%20Gabriel__ECR2015.jpg?itok=hd3WRsbk 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_KRESTIN%20Gabriel__ECR2015.jpg?itok=hd3WRsbk" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_Fuchsjager%20Michael_ECR2015.JPG?itok=TO-NZLhH 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_Fuchsjager%20Michael_ECR2015.JPG?itok=TO-NZLhH 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_Fuchsjager%20Michael_ECR2015.JPG?itok=TO-NZLhH 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_Fuchsjager%20Michael_ECR2015.JPG?itok=TO-NZLhH 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_Fuchsjager%20Michael_ECR2015.JPG?itok=TO-NZLhH 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_Fuchsjager%20Michael_ECR2015.JPG?itok=TO-NZLhH 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC5a_Fuchsjager%20Michael_ECR2015.JPG?itok=TO-NZLhH" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>The use of teleradiology to save money has exposed radiology to a great danger, according to Prof. Michael Fuchsjäger, chairman of general radiology at Graz Medical University, Austria. “The commoditisation of our services is really an issue and a threat. In the last two to three decades, radiology has become digitised, and a perception has been created that we are working behind our screens in a dark and quiet room and don’t want to be annoyed by clinical questions, which is highly detrimental to our profession,” he said.</p> <p>To counter this damaging perception, radiologists have to be visible, and active in discussions and multidisciplinary meetings, but also in their interaction with the patient, he said.</p> <p>With spiralling health costs and limited budgets, radiology can also expect to come under review in order to contain costs, and a concept everyone should become familiar with is health technology assessment (HTA). Dr. Jane Adam, consultant in diagnostic radiology at St. George’s Hospital, London, and chair of the ESR Quality, Safety and Standards Committee, will explain to delegates what they can expect, during the session.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p>***</p> <p>Gabriel P. Krestin, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Michael Fuchsjäger, Graz, Austria</p> <p> </p> <h4>Professional Challenges Session</h4> <p>Thursday, March 5, 08:30–10:00, Room E2<br /><strong>PC 5a Looking into the future of radiology</strong></p> <ul><li><strong>Chairmen’s introduction</strong><br /> M.H. Fuchsjäger; Graz/AT<br /> G. Paulo; Coimbra/PT</li> <li><strong>Health technology assessment (HTA)</strong><br /> E.J. Adam; London/UK</li> <li><strong>The influence of health economics systems on radiology</strong><br /> D. Katsifarakis; Athens/GR</li> <li><strong>Quo vadis radiology professions? A pragmatic approach</strong><br /> G.P. Krestin; Rotterdam/NL</li> <li><strong>Panel discussion: What is the role of European societies in building a sustainable model for radiology?</strong></li> </ul><p><strong>Captions</strong>:<br /> (right) Prof. Gabriel Krestin, chairman of the department of radiology at Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands.<br /> (left) Prof. Michael Fuchsjäger, chairman of general radiology at Graz Medical University, Austria.<br /><strong>Copyright</strong>: © ESR – European Society of Radiology</p> </div> </div> <i class="banner-image"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg" alt="EU &amp; International Affairs" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </i> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://myesr.org/article/87" data-a2a-title="Insights into the future of radiology"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a> <a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a> <a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a></span> Thu, 05 Mar 2015 10:17:20 +0000 myESR 87 at http://myesr.org Experts to consider all aspects of breast ultrasound http://myesr.org/article/82 <span property="schema:name">Experts to consider all aspects of breast ultrasound</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span title="View user profile." href="/user/1" lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">myESR</span> </span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2015-03-04T10:12:07+00:00">Wed, 03/04/2015 - 11:12</span> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p><strong>Wednesday, March 4 (ECR)</strong> – Imaging dense breasts or tissue abnormalities is still challenging in breast screening, but breast ultrasound continues to prove its utility, experts will show today in a Refresher Course at the ECR.</p> <p>It is estimated that mammography sensitivity ranges from 65% to 91%. The masking effect of dense breast tissue is the most relevant cause of false-negatives, according to Dr. Veronica Girardi from the Istituti Ospedalieri Bresciani in Brescia, Italy.</p> <p>“When we consider breast density, there are two different issues: one is that it’s influencing cancer detection on mammographic imaging and the second is its possible independent effect on breast cancer risk. Breast density is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer at any age, but it does not seem to influence ultrasound accuracy. For this reason, the association of ultrasound to mammography in women with dense breasts has been proposed by many authors, although there is no evidence of mortality reduction,” she said.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>Ultrasound is quick, widely available, well tolerated, very safe, and relatively cheap. It can boost cancer detection by about 2.9%, Girardi noted. However, ultrasound may also increase false-positive biopsies, which means it implies a relevant additional cost and causes a major increment of invasive diagnostic procedures. According to previous studies, additional cancer detection by ultrasound is likely to improve screening benefit in dense breasts. Therefore it supports the implementation of a randomised trial of adjunct ultrasound in women with increased breast tissue density, Girardi believes. She recommends ultrasound screening in women at very high risk for breast cancer – women with a lifetime risk of over 20%, who are BRCA positive, or have a family history of pre-menopausal breast cancer, who cannot tolerate breast MR imaging. Women with dense breast tissue and intermediate or average risk should also be screened with ultrasound.</p> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC102_ECR2015_Ultrasound_Girardi.jpg?itok=c9DaALx8 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC102_ECR2015_Ultrasound_Girardi.jpg?itok=c9DaALx8 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC102_ECR2015_Ultrasound_Girardi.jpg?itok=c9DaALx8 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC102_ECR2015_Ultrasound_Girardi.jpg?itok=c9DaALx8 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC102_ECR2015_Ultrasound_Girardi.jpg?itok=c9DaALx8 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC102_ECR2015_Ultrasound_Girardi.jpg?itok=c9DaALx8 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/RC102_ECR2015_Ultrasound_Girardi.jpg?itok=c9DaALx8" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p>Elastosonography offers potential, according to Dr. Corinne Balleyguier from the diagnostic imaging department at Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus in Villejuif, France, as it improves the specificity of ultrasound. The most common elasticity imaging technique is free-hand elastography, which is heavily dependent on the operator. Shear-wave elasticity imaging provides qualitative and quantitative analysis of a lesion, and is less dependent on the operator, she pointed out.<br /><br /> Shear-wave elasticity or elastography may improve breast lesion characterisation and help better categorise undetermined lesions such as BI-RADS 4a and 3 nodules. Elasticity imaging characteristics have actually been added to the latest version of the BI-RADS ultrasound lexicon.<br /><br /> Dr. Suzanne Diepstraten, from the radiology department at the University Medical Centre Utrecht in the Netherlands, will question the necessity of nodal staging of breast cancer.<br /> ***</p> <p>Veronica Girardi, Brescia, Italy; Corinne Balleyguier, Villejuif, France</p> <h4>Refresher Course: Breast</h4> <p>Wednesday, March 4, 08:30–10:00, Room F2<br /><strong>RC 102 Breast ultrasound 2015</strong><br /> Moderator: K. Kinkel; Chêne-Bougeries/CH</p> <ul><li><strong>A. Evidence for screening in dense breasts</strong><br /> V. Girardi; Brescia/IT</li> <li><strong>B. Elastosonography: true advances or false hope?</strong><br /> C.S. Balleyguier; Villejuif/FR</li> <li><strong>C. Nodal staging of breast cancer: still needed?</strong><br /> S.C.E. Diepstraten; Utrecht/NL</li> </ul><p><strong>Caption</strong>: A 62-year-old woman with non-palpable 9 mm invasive ductal carcinoma only seen on ultrasound. A radial sonogram obtained at the 5 o’clock position in the left breast shows a hypoechoic irregular mass.<br /><strong>Copyright</strong>: © Dr. Veronica Girardi, Istituti Ospedalieri Bresciani in Brescia, Italy</p> </div> </div> <i class="banner-image"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg" alt="EU &amp; International Affairs" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </i> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://myesr.org/article/82" data-a2a-title="Experts to consider all aspects of breast ultrasound"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a> <a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a> <a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a></span> Wed, 04 Mar 2015 10:12:07 +0000 myESR 82 at http://myesr.org Radiologists must act as doctors, not photographers, experts say http://myesr.org/article/80 <span property="schema:name">Radiologists must act as doctors, not photographers, experts say</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span title="View user profile." href="/user/1" lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">myESR</span> </span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2015-03-04T10:09:01+00:00">Wed, 03/04/2015 - 11:09</span> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p><strong>Wednesday, March 4 (ECR)</strong> – Radiologists will soon face dangers if they don’t claim their place in the medical team, experts will argue in today’s Professional Challenges session at the ECR.</p> <p>Radiologists must step out of their offices and show that they can bring added value to the team, according to Prof. Jim Reekers, professor of interventional radiology at the University of Amsterdam, who will chair the session. “Being the photographers or doctors who only give a report with a picture will not secure their future because anybody can make and look at a picture nowadays. The difference the radiologist brings is that he or she can give an interpretation of the picture within the context of a patient’s clinical situation,” he said.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>Subspecialisation is a way for radiologists to ensure their survival, as the service provided goes beyond the simple interpretation of images, according to Dr. Nicola Strickland, a consultant radiologist at the Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Hammersmith Hospital in London.</p> <p>“We can protect ourselves by remaining at the forefront of radiological knowledge, which means that radiologists everywhere will have to subspecialise to some extent. We have to remember that we are all doctors first and radiologists second. We are interpreting the imaging studies in the light of our medical knowledge of the patient’s condition,” she said.</p> <p>Advances in IT over the past decade have been noticeable in medical imaging perhaps more than in any other area of clinical practice; radiologists should use that advantage to become indispensable, Strickland believes. But in the absence of a system enabling doctors to access all of the patient’s imaging history, radiologists will have to fight for immediate access to past imaging and to the imaging study reports, with integration across the whole healthcare network.</p> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Strickland_Nicola_UK.jpg?itok=-AuUXQhP 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Strickland_Nicola_UK.jpg?itok=-AuUXQhP 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Strickland_Nicola_UK.jpg?itok=-AuUXQhP 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Strickland_Nicola_UK.jpg?itok=-AuUXQhP 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Strickland_Nicola_UK.jpg?itok=-AuUXQhP 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Strickland_Nicola_UK.jpg?itok=-AuUXQhP 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Strickland_Nicola_UK.jpg?itok=-AuUXQhP" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <div> <i class="circle"> <article class="media media-medium-image view-mode-image-circle"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Jim%20Reekers.jpg?itok=p9w_OquT 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Jim%20Reekers.jpg?itok=p9w_OquT 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Jim%20Reekers.jpg?itok=p9w_OquT 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Jim%20Reekers.jpg?itok=p9w_OquT 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Jim%20Reekers.jpg?itok=p9w_OquT 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Jim%20Reekers.jpg?itok=p9w_OquT 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/PC4a_ECR2015_Jim%20Reekers.jpg?itok=p9w_OquT" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </article> </i> </div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-6"> <p>Experts will also address threats linked to the commoditisation of radiology services. Reekers, who has strong opinions on the subject, will explain why he thinks teleradiology will be “the downfall of radiology”. “Teleradiology is a disaster: it is going to kill radiology. If this continues, radiology will not exist in 15 years, because everything will be gone. The moment the doctor is not in the hospital anymore, the clinicians will start reading films themselves. They’ll say they don’t need teleradiology anymore. But if you have a very good radiologist who’s very much like a partner, you don’t need teleradiology,” he said.</p> <p>He suggested physicians should develop a network of specialists outside their hospital and cooperate with these experts when necessary instead of using teleradiology.</p> <p>For Strickland, an in-sourcing solution between regional hospitals where doctors all know each other could be an alternative in some cases. The appropriateness of teleradiology use in well-defined circumstances (e.g. acute situations) should be carefully decided upon, she added.</p> </div> </div> <div class="row p-relative"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12"> <p>Last but not least, experts will discuss what future radiology training should look like.<br /> ***</p> <p>Jim Reekers, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Nicola Strickland, London, UK</p> <p> </p> <h4>Professional Challenges Session<br />  </h4> <p>Wednesday, March 4, 16:00–17:30, Room E2<br /><strong>PC 4a Radiologist: imager or doctor?</strong></p> <ul><li><strong>Chairman’s introduction</strong><br /> J.A. Reekers; Amsterdam/NL</li> <li><strong>Which type of radiologist is future proof?</strong><br /> N.H. Strickland; London/UK</li> <li><strong>Is subspecialisation the answer?</strong><br /> J.A. Reekers; Amsterdam/NL</li> <li><strong>Is teleradiology a threat to radiology?</strong><br /> A. Palko; Szeged/HU</li> <li><strong>Radiology training for the future</strong><br /> B. Ertl-Wagner; Munich/DE</li> <li><strong>Panel discussion: How do radiologists stay relevant and what is the role of the ESR?</strong></li> </ul><p><strong>Captions</strong>: Jim Reekers, professor of interventional radiology at the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Nicola Strickland, consultant radiologist at the Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Hammersmith Hospital in London, United Kingdom.<br /><strong>Copyright</strong>: © ESR – European Society of Radiology</p> </div> </div> <i class="banner-image"> <picture> <!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg 1x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 992px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (min-width: 768px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/max_1300x1300/public/2016-10/affairs.jpg?itok=d-ZgclW6 1x" media="all and (max-width: 767px)" type="image/jpeg"/> <!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--> <img srcset="/sites/default/files/2016-10/affairs.jpg" alt="EU &amp; International Affairs" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </picture> </i> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://myesr.org/article/80" data-a2a-title="Radiologists must act as doctors, not photographers, experts say"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a> <a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a> <a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a></span> Wed, 04 Mar 2015 10:09:01 +0000 myESR 80 at http://myesr.org